Ranger News

The Ranger News Blog presents current news within the Ranger community; members and the public viewing our website can add comments.

  • 08/16/2010 8:56 AM | Anonymous

    Public Wake

    Tuesday August 17 from 4-8 p.m.

    Holy Family Parish,

    2 School St

    Amesbury, Mass.

    Public Funeral Mass

    Wednesday August 18 from 10 a.m. to noon

    Holy Family Parish,

    2 School St

    Amesbury, Mass.

    Burial

    Wednesday August 18 at about 3:30 p.m.

    New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery

    110 Daniel Webster Highway, Rt 3

    Boscawen, New Hampshire 03303

    In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made and payable to: Wounded Warriors Project and sent to WWP National Processing Center, P.O. Box 758516 Topeka, KN 66675. Arrangements are by, and correspondence can be sent to E.V. Jutras & Sons, 118 Friend St., Amesbury, MA 01913.

    In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made and payable to: Wounded Warriors Project and sent to WWP National Processing Center, P.O. Box 758516 Topeka, KN 66675. Arrangements are by, and correspondence can be sent to E.V. Jutras & Sons, 118 Friend St., Amesbury, MA 01913.

    Sgt. Andrew Cote Nicol

    Sgt. Andrew Cote Nicol, 23, was a team leader assigned to Company B, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment at Fort Benning, Ga. He was born on Feb. 7, 1987 and was a native of Kensington, N.H.

    Nicol was seriously wounded by an enemy improvised explosive device during a combat operation in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. He was treated immediately by unit medical personnel and quickly evacuated to the nearest treatment facility where he died of his wounds.

    He was on his fifth combat deployment. Nicol had previously deployed twice to Afghanistan and twice to Iraq.

    After graduating from Exeter High School, Nicol enlisted in the U.S. Army in July 2006. He completed One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning as an infantryman. After graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he was assigned to the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program also at Fort Benning.

    Following graduation from the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program in March 2007, Nicol was assigned to Company B, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, where he served as a rifleman and a team leader.

    His military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, the U.S. Army Ranger Course and the Warrior Leader Course.

    His awards and decorations include the Ranger Tab, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Expert Infantryman Badge, and the Parachutist Badge. Nicol was also awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Valor, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Combat Star, Iraq Campaign Medal with Combat Star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Non-Commissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon and Overseas Service Ribbon.

    He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal and Purple Heart.

    Nicol is survived by his parents Roland and Patricia Nicol of Kensington, N. H.

    Click here to read the original news story. 

  • 08/11/2010 4:59 PM | Anonymous

    The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of two U.S. servicemen, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

    They are 1st Lt. Paul G. Magers of Sidney, Neb., and Chief Warrant Officer 2 Donald L. Wann of Shawnee, Okla., both U.S. Army. Magers is to be buried Aug. 27 in Laurel, Mont., and

    Wann’s funeral is on Aug. 21st in Fort Gibson, Okla. Representatives from the Army’s mortuary office met with the next-of-kin of these men to explain the recovery and identification process and to coordinate interment with military honors on behalf of the Secretary of the Army.

    On June 1, 1971, both men were flying aboard an AH-1 Cobra gunship in support of an emergency extraction of an Army Ranger team in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam. After the Rangers were extracted, helicopters were ordered to destroy claymore mines which had been left behind in the landing zone. During this mission their helicopter was hit by ground fire, crashed and exploded. The ordnance aboard the aircraft began to detonate, tearing the aircraft apart. Pilots who witnessed the explosions concluded that no one could have survived the crash and explosions. Enemy activity in the area precluded a ground search.

    In 1990, analysts from DPMO, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and their predecessor organizations interviewed both American and Vietnamese witnesses and produced leads for field investigations. In 1993 and 1998, two U.S.-Socialist Republic of Vietnam teams, led by JPAC, surveyed the suspected crash site and found artifacts and debris consistent with a Cobra gunship. In mid-1999, another joint team excavated the site, but it stopped for safety reasons when the weather deteriorated. No remains were recovered, but the team did find wreckage associated with the specific crash they were investigating.

    The Vietnamese government subsequently declared the region within Quang Tri Province where the aircraft crashed as off-limits to U.S. personnel, citing national security concerns. As part of an agreement with JPAC, a Vietnamese team unilaterally excavated the site and recovered human remains and other artifacts in 2008. The Vietnamese returned to the site in 2009, expanded the excavation area and discovered more remains and additional evidence.

    Forensic analysis, circumstantial evidence and the mitochondrial DNA match to the Magers and Wann families by the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory confirmed the identification of the remains.

    For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO web site at http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo

  • 08/11/2010 10:15 AM | Anonymous

    Visitation:

    Tuesday August 10

    10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Vance Memorial Chapel

    3738 Hwy 431 N

    Phenix City, AL 36867

     

    Funeral Service:

    Thursday August 12

    12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

    Chattanooga National Cemetery

    1200 Bailey Ave. Chattanooga, TN

     

    Staff Sergeant Sean Steven Cook, 22 of Ft. Mitchell, AL passed away Wednesday, August 4, 2010 at Columbus Regional Medical Center.

    Graveside services will be held 12:00 noon Thursday, August 12, 2010 at Chattanooga National Cemetery with Rev. David Graves and Chaplain Major Derek Murray officiating. The family will receive friends Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon EST at Vance Memorial Chapel, 3738 Hwy 431N Phenix City, AL.

    Mr. Cook was born September 5, 1987 in Lexington, KY the son of Stephen Cook and Tammy Jo Welch. He served in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom and was currently stationed at Ft. Benning, GA.

    He is preceded in death by his grandmothers, Gwendolyn Guilfoil and Martha Cook; and a brother Thomas Lee Guilfoil.

    He is survived by his wife Ashley Cook of Ft. Mitchell, AL; his mother Tammy Sharp Welch and husband Lloyd of Cleveland, TN; father Stephen Cook of Chattanooga, TN; and one sister Courtney Sharp of Cleveland, TN.

    In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to, Lead the Way Fund, P.O. Box 281, Manhasset, New York 11030 or www.leadthewayfund.org.

    Original Post: Sgt. Sean Steven Cook, 22, an Army Ranger stationed at Fort Benning dies week after boat accident

    A 22-year-old Fort Benning Ranger has died about a week after a boating accident on Lake Harding.

    Sgt. Sean Steven Cook, 22, an Army Ranger stationed at Fort Benning, was pronounced dead at 5:50 p.m. Wednesday August 4, 2010..

    Cook had been in the Intensive Care Unit of The Medical Center. The cause of his death was multiple injuries including a serious blow to the head suffered on July 29 when the boat he was operating struck the Long Bridge on Lake Harding.

    Cook’s wife, Ashley, who was in the boat with him, was critically injured and remains at The Medical Center.

    The couple’s home is in Fort Mitchell, Ala.

    The accident remains under investigation by the Alabama Marine Police and the Lee County Coroner.

  • 08/09/2010 5:06 PM | Anonymous

    Two U.S. Army Rangers were killed  Aug. 8 during combat operations while deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The Rangers were assigned to Company B, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

    Sgt. Andrew Cote Nicol, 23, a native of Kensington, N. H., and Spc. Bradley David Rappuhn, 24, a native of Grand Ledge, Mich., were seriously wounded in Kandahar Province, by an enemy improvised explosive device.

    Both Rangers were treated immediately by unit medical personnel and were quickly evacuated to the nearest treatment facility where they later died of their wounds.

    Nicol enlisted in the U.S. Army in July 2006.  For more than three years, he served as a rifleman and most recently as a team leader in 3rd Bn., 75th Ranger Regt. Nicol is survived by his parents Roland and atricia Nicol also of Kensington.

    Rappuhn enlisted in the U.S. Army in January 2009. For almost a year, he served as an anti-armor specialist in 3rd Bn., 75th Rgr. Regt. Rappuhn is survived by father Cary Rappuhn of Potterville, Mich., and his mother Roxanne Rappuhn and his brother Brent Rappuhn, both of Grand Ledge.

    “Sgt. Nicol and Pfc. Rappuhn were involved in fighting one of the most heavily defended areas in Afghanistan.  Their actions resulted in the destruction of a complex bunker system that included heavy machine guns, mortar systems and the death of seven Taliban,” said Col. Michael E. Kurilla, commander of the 75th Ranger Regt. “They are heroes to the Nation, the Army and their families.”

    Nicol was on his fifth combat deployment. He previously deployed twice to Afghanistan and twice to Iraq. This was Rappuhn’s first deployment.

    “Sgt. Nicol and Pfc. Rappuhn embodied what it meant to be Rangers,” said Lt. Col. Mark O’Donnell, 3rd Bn. commander. “Selfless, dedicated, and professional, their impact across the battalion was profound.  Their service and friendship will be sorely missed.”

    Biographies for each Ranger follow:

    Sgt. Andrew Cote Nicol

    Sgt. Andrew Cote Nicol, 23, was a team leader assigned to Company B, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment at Fort Benning, Ga. He was born on Feb. 7, 1987 and was a native of Kensington, N.H.

    Nicol was seriously wounded by an enemy improvised explosive device during a combat operation in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. He was treated immediately by unit medical personnel and quickly evacuated to the nearest treatment facility where he died of his wounds.

    He was on his fifth combat deployment. Nicol had previously deployed twice to Afghanistan and twice to Iraq.

    After graduating from Exeter High School, Nicol enlisted in the U.S. Army in July 2006. He completed One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning as an infantryman. After graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he was assigned to the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program also at Fort Benning.

    Following graduation from the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program in March 2007, Nicol was assigned to Company B, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, where he served as a rifleman and a team leader.

    His military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, the U.S. Army Ranger Course and the Warrior Leader Course.

    His awards and decorations include the Ranger Tab, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Expert Infantryman Badge, and the Parachutist Badge. Nicol was also awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Valor, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Combat Star, Iraq Campaign Medal with Combat Star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Non-Commissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon and Overseas Service Ribbon.

    He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal and Purple Heart.

    Nicol is survived by his parents Roland and Patricia Nicol of Kensington, N. H.

    Spc. Bradley David Rappuhn

    Spc. Bradley David Rappuhn was an anti-armor specialist assigned to Company B, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment at Fort Benning, Ga. He was born on April 24, 1986, in Lansing, Mich.

    He was seriously wounded by an enemy improvised explosive device during a combat operation in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. Rappuhn was treated immediately by unit medical personnel and quickly evacuated to the nearest treatment facility where he died of his wounds.

    Rappuhn was on his first deployment in support of the Global War on Terror.

    After graduating from Grand Ledge High School in Grand Ledge, Mich., Rappuhn enlisted in the U.S. Army in January 2009. He completed One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning as an infantryman. After graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he was assigned to the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program also at Fort Benning.

    Following graduation from the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program in August 2009, Rappuhn was assigned to Company B, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, where he served as an anti-armor specialist.

    His military education includes the Basic Airborne Course and the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program.

    Rappuhn's awards and decorations include the Combat Infantryman Badge and the Parachutist Badge. He was also awarded the Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Combat Star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, and Army Service Ribbon.

    He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal and Purple Heart.

    Rapphun is survived by his father, Cary Rappuhn, of Potterville, Mich., and his mother, Roxanne Rappuhn and his brother, Brent Rappuhn, both of Grand Ledge.

  • 08/06/2010 10:12 AM | Anonymous

    For half a century, the likeness of MAJ(R) Eugene Wyles, known as the iconic “Follow Me” statue, has symbolized both the spirit and the Home of the Infantry. On July 31, Wyles passed away of natural causes at his residence in Columbia, La. He was 77.

    Wyles was born in Gilbert, La., Sept. 27, 1932, to Benjamin Franklin and Mary Isabell Coody Wyles.

    He joined the Army at 17 and after reaching the rank of sergeant first class, the Army’s top NCO grade at the time, Wyles entered Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning. There, he was chosen among four candidates to be the model for what would become “Follow Me.”

    Originally called “The Infantryman,” the statue was dedicated May 3, 1960, on Eubanks Field by then-Secretary of the Army Wilber Brucker. Wyles was flown in on a helicopter from Ranger School in Dahlonega, Ga., to attend the unveiling ceremony.

    Four years later, it was moved to the new Infantry Hall and renamed “Follow Me.” 

A bronze replica was built in 2004 and stands on post in front of Building 35, the former Infantry headquarters that’s now Ridgway Hall. But the original statue became part of the National Infantry Museum collection and sits atop a granite pedestal in the rotunda outside.

    On his trip to Fort Benning May 3 to commemorate the 50th birthday of the statue outside the National Infantry Museum and Soldier Center at Patriot Park, Wyles showed his humble nature in describing his feelings about the likeness.

    “That’s not me. …” he said. “That is the Infantry. And that’s those guys that don’t get any publicity that it represents. It’s not me ... It’s the Infantry and the Infantry spirit.” Wyles was enlisted for 10 years and spent another decade as an officer, completing one tour in Korea and two in Vietnam.

    According to his obituary on the Riser Funeral Home’s website, Wyles’ awards and decorations included the Purple Heart, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commendation Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal with five campaign stars, Vietnam Campaign Medal with 60- Device, Combat Infantryman’s Badge, Parachute Badge and Ranger Tab.

    He was preceded in death by his parents; his brother, Benjamin Wesley Wyles, and sister, Odell Phillips. Survivors include his wife and longtime companion, Jeanette Wyles; three sons: Kenny Wyles of Wyola, Mont., Ceivert Laforge of Prior, Mont., and Robert Byrd of Denver; three daughters: Linda Andrews and husband, Robert, of Dayton, Wyo., Rickee Faddis of Denver; and Terri Johnson and husband, Shannon, of West Monroe, La.; a sister; Imogene Powell, of Swartz, La.; 21 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and his beloved dog, Sam.

    Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Aug. 7 at the chapel of Riser Funeral Home in Columbia, La. Visitation will be at the funeral home from noon until the time of the service.

  • 08/06/2010 9:30 AM | Anonymous

    Funeral scheduled for CPT Jason E. Holbrook in  Burnet, Texas (update)

    Visitation

    Friday, August 06, 2010

    5:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    Clements-Wilcox

    306 East Polk

    Burnet, TX

    Funeral Service

    Saturday, August 07, 2010

    10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    First Baptist Church

    108 South Vanderveer

    Burnet, TX 78611

    (512) 756-4482

     

    In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions be made to The Captain Jason Ellis Holbrook Scholarship at Burnet High School through the First State Bank of Burnet.

     

    Please visit www.clementswilcoxuburnet.com

     

    Original news: CPT Jason E. Holbrook, Special Forces Operational Detachment-Alpha team leader, KIA in Afghanistan

    CPT Jason E. Holbrook, 28, died of wounds sustained from an IED blast during a combat reconnaissance patrol. He was a Special Forces Operational Detachment-Alpha team leader assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne).

    He deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in July 2010 as a member of the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force – Afghanistan. This was his second deployment.

    Holbrook, a native of Burnet, Texas; was accepted the United States Military Academy where he majored in Environmental Science. CPT Holbrook’s first assignment was as a Rifle Platoon Leader in Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 501st (Airborne) at Fort Richardson, Alaska. He served there for three years and deployed with the unit to Iraq between 2006 and 2007. Following his deployment he reported to Fort Benning, GA to attend the Maneuver Captains Career Course and then Fort Bragg, NC, to attend the Special Forces Qualification Course. CPT Holbrook graduated the course on the 16th of April, 2010 and reported to 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group on the 27th of May.

    Holbrook’s military education includes the Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape Course, Ranger Course, Basic Airborne Course, Infantry Officer Basic Course, Infantry Maneuver Captains Career Course and Special Forces Qualification Course.

    His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, National Defense Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Medal, Parachutist Badge, Combat Infantry Badge, Expert Infantryman Badge, Ranger Tab and the Special Forces Tab.

    He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, NATO Medal, and Meritorious Service Medal.

    Holbrook is survived by his wife Heather Holbrook of Fayetteville, N.C.; mother and father Joan and James Holbrook of Burnet, Texas.

  • 07/28/2010 12:55 PM | Anonymous

    A contingent of about 20 Rockford police officers traveled to Elgin to pay their respects to former officer Anibal Santiago.

    Santiago, 37, an Army Ranger, died July 18 from injuries he suffered a day earlier in a high-altitude fall while conducting combat operations in Khost province, Afghanistan. He was on his third deployment at the time.

    Santiago was a sniper team leader assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. He served in the Navy from 1991 to 1995 and was on the Rockford force from 1999 to 2005.

    The officers who traveled to Harvest Bible Chapel were joined by about 30 Army Rangers and a military color guard.

    Rockford officer Aurelio DeLaRosa, past president of the police union, said he helped train Santiago, but at times the teacher was learning from the pupil.

    “He was a defender of freedom and the American way of life. As an U.S. Army soldier, he was ready to deploy and meet the enemy anywhere in the world. I was honored to have known and to serve alongside of him.”

    DeLaRosa said serving others and his country was Santiago’s calling.

    “Being the true patriot that he was, he felt it was a moral imperative that he serve his country. Not only was he just a soldier, but an elite soldier.

    “If anybody has any doubt today, this funeral was a validation of the character of this man.”

    Santiago is survived by his wife, Mandy; son, Hannibal Felix Santiago of Belvidere; stepsons Desmond and Darian Thammarath of Fort Benning, Ga.; and parents, Anibal and Maria Santiago of Belvidere.

    Later in the day, the family attended a private ceremony. A private graveside service is planned today in Highland Garden of Memories in Belvidere.

     

    Memorial and funeral schedule for U.S. Army Ranger Sgt. Anibal Santiago in Elgin, IL  (update) July 23, 2010 17:13:11

     

    Memorial Services will be held starting this weekend when Sgt. Santiago’s body will fly into Chicago O'Hare Saturday July 24 to be escorted to Laird Funeral Home in Elgin.

    Visitation:

    Monday Jul 26 from 2:00 pm to 8:00 pm and

         Tuesday, July 27 from 2:00pm to 6:00pm

    Harvest Bible Chapel

    1000 North Randall Road

    Elgin, IL 60123-7895

    (847) 214-3500,

    Military Honors Committal Services:

    Wednesday July 28 at 10:00am

    Harvest Bible Chapel

    1000 North Randall Road

    Elgin, IL 60123-7895

    (847) 214-3500,

    Private Graveside Service:

    Thursday, July 29

    Highland Garden of Memories

    9800 Route 76

    Belvidere, IL 61008

    (815) 544-2750

    For information:

    Laird Funeral Home

    310 S. State Street

    Elgin, IL 60123

    (847) 741-8800

    Santiago is survived by his wife, Mandy Santiago of Fort Benning, GA, son Hannibal of Belvidere, IL., stepsons Desmond and Darian, from Fort Benning, and his parents Anibal and Maria Santiago of Belvidere.

     

     

    Original Post:

    U.S. Army Ranger Sgt. Anibal Santiago dies as a result of injuries sustained during combat

    Sgt. Anibal Santiago, 37 of Belvidere, Ill., died from injuries sustained as a result of a high-altitude fall July 17 while conducting combat operations over mountainous terrain in Khowst Province, Afghanistan. Treated immediately by unit medical personnel, he was quickly evacuated to the nearest medical treatment facility where he died July 18.

    Santiago was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment based at Fort Benning, Ga.  He  was serving his third deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism, having previously deployed once to Afghanistan and once to Iraq.

     “I wish the American public had an opportunity to know Sgt. Santiago. He embodied the Ranger Ethos – an American Patriot, incredibly lethal sniper, and was always at his best when conditions were the worst,” said Col. Michael E. Kurilla, commander, 75th Ranger Regiment. “He is a hero to our Nation, the 75th Ranger Regiment, and his Family.”

     “Sgt. Santiago was a rock of a man that everyone – his fellow Rangers and his Family – relied on in the toughest of times," said Col. Dan Walrath, commander, 3rd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment. " He was an incredible servant to the Nation as a policeman, Navy Sailor and Army Ranger.  We are eternally grateful for what he gave us all in life.”

    Sgt. Anibal Santiago was born August 26th, 1972 in Puerto Rico.  Prior to his military service he served as a policeman in Chicago, Ill., for numerous years and also graduated from Elgin Community College with a Liberal Arts degree. Santiago then entered the U. S. Navy on Oct. 1, 2001.

    Following his service in the Navy, Santiago entered the U. S. Army on Oct. 1, 2007 and after completion of the One Station Unit Training and the Ranger Indoctrination Program, he was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment on Sept. 30, 2008. He served as a sniper and as a sniper team leader.

    Santiago completed numerous military courses while serving in the Army, including the Combat Life Savers Course, Combatives Level One, the Sniper Course, the Airborne Course, the Ranger Indoctrination Program, and the U.S. Army Ranger Course.

    His awards and decorations include the Ranger Tab, the Combat Infantryman Badge, and the Parachutist Badge. He has also been awarded the Navy Unit Commendation Medal, the Army Commendation Medal, the Navy Good Conduct Medal, The Army Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Navy Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, The South West Asia Service Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, the Iraq Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, and the Army Service Ribbon.

    He was posthumously recommended for the Bronze Star Medal and the Meritorious Service Medal.

    Santiago is survived by his wife, Mandy of Fort Benning Ga., his son, Hannibal Felix of Belvidere, Ill.; and his parents, Anibal and Maria Santiago of Belvidere, Ill.

    As a Ranger, Santiago selflessly lived his life for others while he distinguished himself as a member of the Army’s premier light-infantry unit, which remains continuously deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism. In every instance he fought valiantly as he served his fellow Rangers and our great Nation.

    Belvidere soldier's young son remembers dad as "my hero"

     

     

  • 07/27/2010 10:00 PM | Anonymous

    Several photos and information to be posted.

    Please visit again tomorrow.

     

     

     

     

     

    Memorial and funeral scheduled for U.S. Army Ranger Sgt. Justin Bradley Allen in Coal Grove, Ohio (update) July 25, 2010 15:21:12

     

    The following plans have been made by the family.

    Visitation:

    Monday, July 26, 2010
    6:00 PM until 9:00 PM
    Dawson Bryant High School
    427 Marion Pike
    Coal Grove, Ohio 45638

    Funeral Service/Burial:

    Tuesday July 27, 2010

    11:00 AM

    Dawson Bryant High School

    427 Marion Pike

    Coal Grove, Ohio 45638

    Burial will follow in Woodland Cemetery in Coal Grove with full Military Honors.

    For additional information:

    Phillips Funeral Home

    1004 S. 7th St.

    Ironton, OH 45638

    Phone: (740) 532-2144

    Email: phillipsfuneralhome@roadrunner.com

     

    Initial story follows,

    U.S. Army Ranger Sgt. Justin Bradley Allen killed in action in  Kandahar Province, Afghanistan

    Sgt. Justin Bradley Allen was killed in a fire fight with enemy forces while deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The Ranger was assigned to Company D, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.

    Allen, 23, a native of Coal Grove, Ohio, was killed in Kandahar Province, by enemy forces on July 18.  Sgt. Allen was leading his team in an assault on an enemy position when he was mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire.

    Allen enlisted in the U.S. Army in May 2006.  For almost four years, he served as a grenadier, automatic rifleman and most recently as a team leader.

    “Sgt. Allen was an absolute warrior who was admired and respected by everyone,” said Lt. Col. Michael Foster, 1st Bn. Commander. “He was a man of immense talent and capabilities, and a bedrock of Delta Company.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to the entire Allen family.”

    Allen was on his second deployment to Afghanistan with two previous deployments to Iraq.

    “Sgt. Allen epitomized the Ranger Fire Team Leader - skilled Warrior, always led from the front, and cared fiercely for his men,” said Col. Michael E. Kurilla, commander of the 75th Rgr. Regt. “He is a hero to our Nation, the 75th Ranger Regiment, and to his family.”

    Allen was born on Aug. 7, 1986 in Ashland, Ky.  After graduating from Dawson Bryant High School, Allen enlisted in the U.S. Army in May 2006. He completed One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Ga. as an Infantryman. Then after graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he was assigned to the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program at Fort Benning.

    Following graduation from the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, Allen was assigned to Company B, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment in October 2007 where he served as a grenadier and automatic rifleman. He was later transferred to Company D where he served as a team leader.

    His military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, the U.S. Army Ranger Course, and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape Course,

    His awards and decorations include the Ranger Tab, Combat Infantryman Badge, Expert Infantryman Badge, Parachutist Badge and the U.S. Army Basic Rifle Marksmanship Qualification Badge. He was also awarded the Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with combat star, Iraq Campaign Medal with combat star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon.

    He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal and Purple Heart.

    He is survived by his parents Roger and Bonnie Sue Allen of Coal Grove, Ohio.

    Mourning a Fallen Soldier (local news story)

    As a Ranger, Allen selflessly lived his life for others while he distinguished himself as a member of the Army’s premier light-infantry unit, which remains continuously deployed in support of the Global War on Terrorism. In every instance he fought valiantly as he served his fellow Rangers and our great Nation.

  • 07/26/2010 1:56 PM | Anonymous

    CLARKSVILLE, Tenn -- The family of an Army helicopter pilot missing for nearly four decades in Vietnam says his remains have been recovered and will be returned to his native Oklahoma.

    Shannon Wann Plaster told The Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle that the remains of her father, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Donald Wann, were found in 2008 and the military recently confirmed the identification.

    The military, through, the Joint Prisoners of War, Missing in Action Accounting Command, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, has not announced a change in Wann’s status.

    Wann was one of two soldiers, along with 1st Lt. Paul Magers of Sidney, Neb., deployed in a Cobra gunship on June 1, 1971, to extract a group of Army Rangers under attack, then destroy left behind ammunition and mines near Hill 1015, or Dong Tri Mountain.

    Wann and Magers were hit with anti-aircraft fire, causing the helicopter to crash somewhere around the hill, about six miles southwest of Thon Khe Xeng. Six radio calls were made to Wann and Magers. None were answered.

    Wann and Magers were both members of the 158th Aviation Battalion, 160th Aviation Group, 101st Airborne Division, now based at Fort Campbell, Ky. Their remains were never found after their helicopter crashed.

    Search and recovery teams found items related to the crash in the ensuing decades, but never the remains of the two pilots. Then, Plaster said, she got a call out of the blue.

    “I’m like, ‘You’re kidding,’” she said. “Just the knowing of it was like ‘Oh, my god.’“ Plaster said her father’s remains will be returned Aug. 18 and a funeral held Aug. 21 in his hometown of Muskogee, Okla. He will be buried at the Fort Gibson National Cemetery.

    The discovery of the remains has ended a lifelong mystery, Plaster said, even though she barely knew him before he deployed to Vietnam.

    “I have been so sad, so tired, so depressed my entire life,” she said. “You have this open wound that never heals.”

    “It’s going to be a welcome home party,” she said. “We’re going to celebrate his life. It’s going to be a lot of tears, but we’re going to have a lot of happy tears.”

    Wann was a career soldier, though his distinguished military career began in the Navy, where he served from 1955-66. He was a photographer in the Navy, journaling top-secret missions he could never tell his wife, Ruth, about or even where he had been. He deployed to Antarctica as part of Operation Deep Freeze, one of just a handful of soldiers and sailors to do so in their careers.

    For Plaster, the funeral is more than just burying her father, it is a relief.

    “I feel like I got a million pounds lifted off my chest,” she said. “I have a resting place. Before now all I had was a name on a wall.”

     

  • 07/25/2010 10:16 AM | Anonymous

    The former command sergeant major at Walter Reed Army Medical Center is facing up to 16 years in prison on charges he falsified his official record and wore a litany of decorations and qualification badges he was not awarded.

    Charges filed July 8 accused Command Sgt. Maj. Stoney N. Crump of wearing 11 awards that he didn’t earn, including the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with Arrowhead Device, the Presidential Unit Citation Award, and the Senior Parachutist Badge.

    He allegedly wore the decorations and qualification badges at Walter Reed in Washington, Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, Fort Bliss, Texas, and Heidelberg, Germany, according to the charge sheets.

    He is also charged with falsely claiming to have attended several elite schools, including U.S. Army Ranger School, Special Forces Airborne School and Sniper School.

    Crump had been relieved of duty in May for “unauthorized wear/claim of military awards, badges, and decorations,” Army officials said.

    At Walter Reed and Heidelberg, Crump also allegedly falsified his command sergeant major biography by claiming he had been awarded a Marine Corps Combat Action Ribbon and that he was a registered nurse, according to the charge sheets.

    A spokesman for Europe Regional Medical Command in Heidelberg declined to comment because the investigation is ongoing.

    Crump is represented by an attorney at Fort Belvoir Trial Defense Service, according to Army Times. A woman who answered the phone at trial defense services said the office would have no comment on Crump.

    Crump did not return an e-mail seeking comment by deadline on Monday.

    Walter Reed spokesman Chuck Dasey declined to say how Crump’s alleged deceptions were discovered. Crump’s Article 32 hearing similar to a civilian grand jury, is slated for August.

    He faces charges under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, not the Stolen Valor Act, a federal law that was recently ruled unconstitutional. That act was intended to apply to veterans or people who were never in the military, said James Klimaski, a civilian attorney who practices military law.

    Command Sgt. Maj. Stoney N. Crump is accused of falsely claiming the following:

    AWARDS

    Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with Arrowhead Device

    U.S. Navy Achievement Medal

    Meritorious Unit Citation

    Army Superior Award

    Presidential Unit Citation

    U.S. Marine Corps Drill Instructor Ribbon

    Senior Aviation Badge

    Senior Parachutist Badge

    Three overseas service bars

    SCHOOLS

    Reconnaissance School

    Sniper School

    Drill Sergeant Course

    U.S. Army Ranger School

    Special Forces Assessment and Selection Course

    Special Forces Airborne School

    Special Forces Jungle Warfare Course

    Panamanian Jungle School

    Special Operations Combat Medic Course

    Flight Standardization Course.

    In his Walter Reed and Heidelberg bios, he also claimed to be awarded the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Action Ribbon and that he was a registered nurse. In his Heidelberg bio, he claimed he was awarded the Overseas Service Ribbon and the Air Crew Member Badge.

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